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Understanding My Risk
Hazard, Risk, Vulnerability and Resiliency Assessment

In 2022, local authorities, governments and First Nations undertook a collaborative project to identify priority hazards and vulnerabilities in the Cowichan Region and inform risk reduction strategies. The goal of the project was to prioritize the top risks and build resiliency across all areas to reduce risk. The project aims to be complete in December 2023.

The Top Hazards in the Cowichan Area
Drought+
Human Disease+
Lake, River, Stream Flooding+
Coastal Storm Flooding+
Stormwater Flooding+
Landslide Debris Flow+
Earthquake+
Severe Winter Conditions+
Wildfire+
Extreme Heat+
Storm / High-Wind Events+
Critical Infrastructure Interruption+
Security Incident+
Hazardous Material Release+
Dam & Spillway Failure+
What is the risk?

Risk is the likelihood (unlikely or frequently) and impact (low impact, high impact to people, environment, economy etc.) of these hazards. For the 15 most relevant hazards in Cowichan, here is a general summary of the risk.

LOWER RISK
HIGHER RISK
Current Burning Permissions
Open burning—or burning outdoors—is allowed when the wildfire risk is low and can be a useful tool when conducted responsibly. Open burning includes Category 1 campfire, Category 2 and Category 3 open fire.
CATEGORY 3
CATEGORY 2
CATEGORY 1 CAMPFIRE
FIRE BAN
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Regional Water Use Restrictions
During drought conditions, your water system operator may introduce water use restrictions to conserve limited water supplies. There are four stages of water restrictions which are coordinated across the Cowichan Valley. Local conditions may sometimes require a higher stage of water restrictions on certain systems.
No Restrictions
Stage 1 Restrictions
Stage 2 Restrictions
Stage 3 Restrictions
Stage 4 Restrictions
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